Welcome to CACHE, the life caching and biography service.

Have you ever considered telling your life story or that of your family and loved ones? A time capsule of your life to share with family and future generations or colleagues and clients. CACHE can help you do just that as a one off private commission or on an on-going basis to regularly add to an ever-growing personal archive.

Perhaps you have something to celebrate or a story to tell? CACHE also creates unique photo and film presentations that capture a single event or key moments such as a milestone anniversary, a unique holiday, a career or the landmark creation of a new home.

We work with world-class artisans, genealogists and family historians, artists, photographers, filmmakers and designers to produce keepsakes and meticulously crafted presentations, from hand-finished books and captivating films shot by movie making crews to exceptional events and unforgettable experiences.

 

Commissions  

Each CACHE commission is researched, designed and developed from scratch and is as unique as the story being told. Here are a few examples of projects to inspire you. If you would like to know more about the process of commissioning visit Commission Us.

Featured  

CACHE works with some of the world’s best artisans and artists, craftsmen and women, photographers and film-makers, designers and creatives to produce beautiful pieces for our clients. From ancient skills and techniques to the cutting edge of technology, each piece contains the passion, skill and experience from individuals who are the best in their discipline. We want to share with you their stories, below we’ll give you a glimpse into who they are and how produce their work.

The Scribes Studio

Traditionally, scribes were some of the most important figures in ancient civilizations. They were tasked with keeping written records, transcribing important documents, sacred and religious texts along with other administrative and judicial duties for Kings and Queens, nobles, religious institutions, and ancient cities. Despite this administerial focus, surviving examples show how the written word was once treated as a work of art in itself, something we’ve lost as part of everyday life in the modern world. Nonetheless, the discipline has persisted and is practiced by a few extremely talented artisans whose knowledge allows them to produce stunning pieces in exacting historical detail…
Click here to continue reading.

The Interiors Artist

Melissa White is an interiors designer and painter who creates spectacularly beautiful and entirely bespoke pieces for private homes, in addition to working with heritage properties, both public and private, on restoring and, where necessary replacing, some of this nations most treasured interior designs. One of her most recent commissions was to create a mural for the Garden Room at Buckingham Palace for the Queen…
Click here to continue reading.

Working With Children & Animals

Born into the Courtauld family, best know for founding the Courtauld Institute of Art, Emma grew up surrounded by art, imagery and a sense of the family legacy. Following a time working for the Red Cross in Switzerland, which fueled her fascination with people and places, Emma turned her talents to professional portrait photography. Over a 14 year career Emma has photographed a wonderful array of people from politicians to world leaders, celebrities to the aristocracy, thoroughbred race horses to beloved pets…
Click here to continue reading.

The Art of Bookbinding

The craft of bookbinding is believed to have originated in India thousands of years ago. Religious sutras were copied onto palm leaves using a metal stylus, dried and then rubbed with ink which would form a stain in the lettering. These leaves where then numbered and twine used to bind them together between two wooden boards forming a palm leaf book. Buddhist monks took this idea through Persia, Afghanistan, Iran, and China in the first century BC. Over the centuries the techniques spread further and continued to evolve. With the introduction of rag paper and the invention of the printing press the modern book, as we would recognize it today, started to appear from the fifth century onwards…
Click here to continue reading.