The Scribes Studio

Traditionally, scribes were some of the most important figures in ancient civilizations. They were tasked with keeping written records, transcribing important documents, sacred and religious texts along with other administrative and judicial duties for Kings and Queens, nobles, religious institutions, and ancient cities. Despite this administerial focus, surviving examples show how the written word was once treated as a work of art in itself, something we’ve lost as part of everyday life in the modern world. Nonetheless, the discipline has persisted and is practiced by a few extremely talented artisans whose knowledge allows them to produce stunning pieces in exacting historical detail…
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The Interiors Artist

Melissa White is an interiors designer and painter who creates spectacularly beautiful and entirely bespoke pieces for private homes, in addition to working with heritage properties, both public and private, on restoring and, where necessary replacing, some of this nations most treasured interior designs. One of her most recent commissions was to create a mural for the Garden Room at Buckingham Palace for the Queen…
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Working With Children & Animals

Born into the Courtauld family, best know for founding the Courtauld Institute of Art, Emma grew up surrounded by art, imagery and a sense of the family legacy. Following a time working for the Red Cross in Switzerland, which fueled her fascination with people and places, Emma turned her talents to professional portrait photography. Over a 14 year career Emma has photographed a wonderful array of people from politicians to world leaders, celebrities to the aristocracy, thoroughbred race horses to beloved pets…
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The Art of Bookbinding

The craft of bookbinding is believed to have originated in India thousands of years ago. Religious sutras were copied onto palm leaves using a metal stylus, dried and then rubbed with ink which would form a stain in the lettering. These leaves where then numbered and twine used to bind them together between two wooden boards forming a palm leaf book. Buddhist monks took this idea through Persia, Afghanistan, Iran, and China in the first century BC. Over the centuries the techniques spread further and continued to evolve. With the introduction of rag paper and the invention of the printing press the modern book, as we would recognize it today, started to appear from the fifth century onwards…
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